Prohibited Weapons - concealed/disguised weapons and blades

Changes to the ACT Prohibited Weapons Act 1996 - As of March 2018

On 13 February 2018, new ACT legislation came into effect which states that as of 28 March 2018, weapons and blades that are concealed within or disguised as an article that’s not a weapon will be a prohibited weapon. This includes, but is not limited to credit card knives. If you are in possession of an item you suspect might now be a prohibited weapon, destroy or dispose of it safely.

ACT Prohibited Weapons Act 1996 

Changes to the ACT Prohibited Weapons Regulations 1997 - As of 13 February 2018

On 13 February 2018, new ACT legislation came into effect which specifies that suppressors can only be possessed or used by people authorised by permit for the following purposes. These purposes include:

  • Conservation actions including killing fauna on public land
  • Conservation actions including killing fauna on land under rural lease
  • A veterinarian or Conservation officer alleviating the suffering of an animal
  • A CSIRO employee on an expedition to collect museum specimens
  • A Firearms dealer undertaking activities that are reasonable and necessary – including maintaining and testing firearms.

FAQs

What is a concealed or disguised weapon?

Specifically a single or double edged blade that can be made to look like any other thing that is not a weapon. This can include credit card knives, knives that sit within a case that can be slid into a wallet, blades in pens, etc.

What do I do if I think I have a weapon like this?

Either destroy or safely dispose of it. Alternatively, the knife can be removed from the item and safely stored.

Does this mean my Swiss army knife is now a prohibited weapon?

Swiss army knives are not considered prohibited weapons, however, be mindful of carrying such items in public if you do not have a lawful excuse, such as needing it for work.

How do I safely dispose of my knives?

Follow standard and safe knife disposal methods.